16 Mar

FORENSICS,TERRORISM, INTELLIGENCE AND PUBLIC SAFETY

Innovation and collaboration are vital to preventing acts of terrorism…

Deborah Leary. Chief Executive of Forensic Pathways.

 

FORENSICS,TERRORISM, INTELLIGENCE AND PUBLIC SAFETY

Innovation and collaboration are vital to preventing acts of terrorism…

Deborah Leary. Chief Executive of Forensic Pathways.

FORENSICS,TERRORISM, INTELLIGENCE AND PUBLIC SAFETY

 

Innovation and collaboration are vital to preventing acts of terrorism…

 

Deborah Leary. Chief Executive of Forensic Pathways.

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16 Mar

DISCUSSION ON BALLISTICS

Police operate under the assumption that there is no perfect crime, that every “contact leaves a trace”(1) therefore, every crime can in theory be solved. However, effective police work requires a continual balance of the amount of time, effort, and resources that can be applied to the investigation of a particular crime simply because resources are limited. This comes as no surprise, because as we move through our own personal lives we continually evaluate our options and make choices that are most likely to provide us with the most value.

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16 Mar

FOUR HEADS ARE BETTER THAN ONE

Four different participants constructed face composites, using “PRO-Fit”, of familiar and unfamiliar targets, with reference images present or from memory. The “mean” of all four composites, created by morphing (4-Morph) was rated as a better likeness than individual composites on average, and was as good as the best individual likeness. When participants attempted to identify targets from line-ups, 4-Morphs again performed as well as the best individual composite. In a second experiment participants familiar with target women attempted to identify composites, and the trend showed better recognition from multiple composites, whether combined or shown together. In a line-up task with unfamiliar participants, 4-Morphs produced most correct choices, and fewest false positives from target absent or target present arrays. These results have practical implications for the way evidence from different witnesses is used in police investigations.

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16 Mar

DNA AND THE ACTIVE CRIMINAL POPULATION

Analysis of rates of submission of crime scene samples from one police force areas and of matches with offender DNA samples already on the national database demonstrates 1) an increasing rate of submission 2) a steady state of matching at 74% and 3) a reasonable linear fit between number of samples and number of matches, suggesting no diminution in return as the number of submitted samples increased. The results are discussed in terms of the distribution of length of criminal careers, and the implications for practice especially the importance of taking criminal justice samples at the first presenting opportunity.

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